Healthcare CPR (BLS)

Healthcare Professional CPR

Defibrillator Training

Defibrillator Training

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2015 Resuscitation Council Guidelines (Proposal)

Written by Martin Parish. Posted in Uncategorised

The Resuscitation Council have published their draft 2015 guidelines which are currently up for public / stakeholder consultations. As for as we can ascertain, the only change to CPR is a move to a compression depth of 4.5-5.5cm, replacing the existing 5-6cm. No real change then.

We expect the consultation period to be concluded and the formal publication of the 2015 guidelines in the Autumn.

Can we shorten courses?

Written by Martin Parish. Posted in FAQ

We are occasionally asked to shorten courses, but we would have no credibility as a training company if we joined the race to the bottom.

Some of our courses hold certified/verified CPD status, so we cannot change from the registered course duration.  We offer regulated courses where Ofqual/HSE set the course duration, these cannot be altered.  When we write courses such as Manual Handling (Objects), the course duration is set by how long it is going to take to properly cover the material.  Other providers may be able to cover the material quicker, but we would ask whether learning taking place or are people being lectured at, rather than educated.

Why choose face-to-face training?

Written by Martin Parish. Posted in FAQ

Time is a rare commodity and when it comes to learning and development e-learning may seem to be the easy and cheap solution – but the reality is often the result is a false economy in terms of both time and money.

With e-learning, the participant is often isolated and reading through a stream of information. Although the content is usually well presented it does not allow for questioning on the part of the participant or for the sharing of experiences. In subjects such as Safeguarding for example, group interaction plays a key part in the learning process. The second key issue with e-learning is that the information is often only taken on board and retained by the memory for as long as it is needed to pass the ‘test’. Educational research has shown that the information is usually only retained for a few minutes or a few hours and that once the test or quiz has been completed the information literally “drops out of the memory” (Dr Sousa 2014).

For training in subjects such as Safeguarding, Chaperone Training, Equality and Diversity and all of the First Aid and Health and Safety courses required by those working in a health or social care setting, it is vital that information is not just taken in at a surface level in order to ‘tick a box’, but that deeper learning takes place so that information is retained for much longer.

The best way to achieve this is to be part of a learner-centered group. This will allow facilitator to draw upon the diversity and experience of the room, tailor training to meet the group needs and encourage debate and exploration of theories, concepts and practical applications of guidelines. Face-to-face training provides all of these elements as well as truly authentic evidence of learner participation which can be used to evidence how standards are being met and to create individual learning plans.

First Emergence Ltd offers learner-centred, interactive training sessions which engage, motivate and stimulate groups into really thinking about the content and purpose of their training in a positive and safe environment.

Is the Appointed Person a First Aider?

Written by Martin Parish. Posted in FAQ

I get asked this question a lot as a number of providers are advertising an ‘Appointed Person First Aid Course’.  The HSE are very clear, that the Appointed Person is not a First Aider.

“The roles of this appointed person include looking after the first-aid equipment and facilities and calling the emergency services when required.” HSE Website

10th Edition First Aid Manual

Written by Martin Parish. Posted in Update

Move from the 9th Edition Revised to the 10th Edition First Aid Manual (FAM)

Why is this of interest?

Accepted First Aid practice in the UK comes from the current First Aid Manual published by DK, which is now in its 10th Edition.  The main driver for this process is the First Aid at Work suite of courses which overseen by the Health & Safety Executive (HSE).  The HSE Guide for employers GEIS3 States that course content should come from the current edition of the first-aid manual of the Voluntary Aid Societies (St John Ambulance, British Red Cross, St Andrew’s First Aid) in conjunction with the latest guidelines from the Resuscitation Council (UK).

It’s a pretty weak system.  To say to learners that the syllabus for a course is on the shelf in WH Smith doesn’t do anything to add to the credibility of a diminishing industry.  But less about the deregulation of the First Aid industry and more about the changes.

The new 10th edition of the first-aid manual of the Voluntary Aid Societies was released 3rd Feb 2014 with some adjustments and changes to the accepted First-aid Practice.

Page 22 – Requesting Help

New calling of 111 (in England) and other help lines as part of a way of requesting help for non-emergency situations

Page 60 – Life-Saving priorities

Less emphasis on treating the casualty, more on summoning help as being the priority

Page 96 – Infant choking position

The position of supporting the infant on your arm is no longer preferred when treating choking. It has changed to supporting the infant on your leg.  This leaves both your hands free to support the infants head and administer the back blows

Page 100 – Drowning

The treatment here is now more akin to treating any unresponsive casualty with the added 5 initial rescue breaths in CPR is commenced

Page 136 – Fractures

References to applying traction have been removed from the fractures pages, not that a casualty would have ever let you do it anyway

Page 144 – Head Injury

The separate conditions of Head Injury, Concussion and Compression have been merged as it doesn’t matter which condition the casualty has, they are still going to hospital

Page 146 – Facial Injury

Alerting the emergency services has been moved when treating a facial injury, to calling after treatment

Page 155 – Pelvic Injury

Placing padding under the knees when treating a pelvic injury has been removed. Padding should be placed between the legs from the knees to ankles only

Page 215 – Hypoglycaemia.

More specific advice on how much sugar to give as an initial treatment

Page 218 – Seizures in children

More detailed recognition features

Price change – none

HSE Regulation Changes

Written by Martin Parish. Posted in Uncategorised

These changes remove the obligation for the HSE to approve First Aid training providers. What this means is that there is now greater emphasis on the employer choosing the right training provider to meet their needs.

First Aid qualifications are now governed by Ofqual (The Office of Qualifications and Examinations) who are the same body as oversee GCSE’s and A Levels. Some training providers will now print their own certificates others will use an Awarding Organisation who will have a relationship with Ofqual.

The choice is now between training providers who either print their own certificates or who use an Ofqual governed Awarding Organisation.

If you consider an Ofqual governed Awarding Organisation, you can be assured that there are regulations in place to ensure standards. Where training providers print their own certificates, there is no outside regulation or oversight. It has come to light that several insurance companies and professional bodies are only recognising First Aid certificates that have been awarded by an Awarding Organisation.